Tixati : freeware torrent p2p client
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Tixati : freeware torrent p2p client
11-25-2013, 09:43 AM
Post: #1
Tixati : freeware torrent p2p client
Investigating
Quote:[Image: toplogo.png]
Tixati is a New and Powerful P2P System
100% Free, Simple and Easy to Use Bittorrent Client
Contains NO Spyware and NO Ads
Windows and Linux Native Versions Available

[Image: check.png]Simple and easy to use
[Image: check.png]Ultra-fast downloading algorithms
[Image: check.png]DHT, PEX, and Magnet Link support
[Image: check.png]Easy and quick install - no java, no .net
[Image: check.png]
  • Super-efficient peer selection and choking
  • RC4 connection encryption for added security
  • Detailed bandwidth management and charting
  • UDP Peer Connections and NAT router hole-punching
  • Advanced features such as RSS, IP Filtering, Event Scheduler
[Image: check.png]NO Spyware [Image: check.png]NO Ads [Image: check.png]NO Nonsense

What is Tixati?

Tixati is a peer-to-peer file sharing program that uses the popular BitTorrent protocol. This protocol allows many peers to form a cooperative swarm and download very large files with great efficiency.

Tixati is one of the most advanced and flexible BitTorrent clients available. And unlike many other clients, Tixati contains NO SPYWARE, NO ADS, and NO GIMMICKS.

Tixati has the following features:
  • detailed views of all aspects of the swarm, including peers, pieces, files, and trackers
  • support for magnet links, so no need to download .torrent files if a simple magnet-link is available
  • super-efficient peer choking/unchoking algorithms ensure the fastest downloads
  • peer connection encryption for added security
  • full DHT (Distributed Hash Table) implementation for trackerless torrents, including detailed message traffic graphs and customizable event logging
  • advanced bandwidth charting of overall traffic and per-transfer traffic, with separate classification of protocol and file bytes, and with separate classification of outbound traffic for trading and seeding
  • highly flexible bandwidth throttling, including trading/seeding proportion adjustment and adjustable priority for individual transfers and peers
  • bitfield graphs that show the completeness of all downloaded files, what pieces other peers have available, and the health of the overall swarm
  • customizable event logging for each download, and individual event logs for all peers within the swarm
  • expert local file management functions which allow you to move files to a different partition even while downloading is still in progress
  • 100% compatible with the BitTorrent protocol
  • Windows and Linux-GTK native versions available

What are the requirements to run Tixati?

Here is the recommended operating environment:
  • Windows 7 / Vista / XP, or Fedora / Ubuntu / Mandriva Linux
  • CPU processor speed at or above 1 GHz
  • at least 256 MB of free RAM
  • hicolor display with at least 1024x768 display resolution


Up at the top rt-hand corner of the webpage:
Quote:Bitcoin: 1P8PFhnxY6TSgNGHkPLwPtbFiKm9BvzqBk
Litecoin: Lgsx6JmguT12YWKfJuCoTczcjcr5VmWzDw

screenshots here

forum here

news/version history here


*note: as a former uTorrent, qBittorrent, Deluge, BitTorrent, and Shareaza user, thus far i really like this software better. Granted, i've only used it 24hrs thus far, time will tell more. It's user interface isn't as fancy as uTorrent's and Shareaza's fwtw.

Is it voluntary? (because if it isn't, what inherently is it?)
And can it be voluntary, if there's indoctrination, intimidation, coercion, threats & initiation of violence?
[not to be confused with asking: can it be said to be "voluntary" even when such is present.?]
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11-25-2013, 11:12 AM
Post: #2
RE: Tixati : freeware torrent p2p client
Much grass, man. Much grass.

How comezit sounds like a Mexican Indian god?

- NonGuadalajarvey

- NonE the severely deluded Sister Sleazious .).

"I just don't understand how this happens." Undecided
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11-25-2013, 11:46 AM (This post was last modified: 11-25-2013 11:53 AM by eye2i2hear.)
Post: #3
RE: Tixati : freeware torrent p2p client
No doubt, the software name sent Curious George2i into an all2typical monkey romp.
But alas, never turned up any info as to what the name is about --or how it's pronounced *cough* properly/officially?

"ti-x-a-ti"? "tix-a-ti"? "tix`ati"? (is the "x" a ✘ "signature"?!?) Eyebrow Raise

"ti" = "tie"? "tee"? [Image: beagle.gif]

[Image: CuriousAiLLGeorgelogo.com.jpg]

--NonGooglEmoogli

Is it voluntary? (because if it isn't, what inherently is it?)
And can it be voluntary, if there's indoctrination, intimidation, coercion, threats & initiation of violence?
[not to be confused with asking: can it be said to be "voluntary" even when such is present.?]
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
11-25-2013, 07:49 PM (This post was last modified: 11-25-2013 08:17 PM by WorBlux.)
Post: #4
RE: Tixati : freeware torrent p2p client
Ok so where is the source code? I'm a little leary if the source isn't availible, especially for this sort or software.

Anyways transmission does all that, except the file management, analytics, and mabye the advance chocking/unchoking thing. Anyways I was just pulling almost 2MBs/sec (on a 15Mbs connection) with a memory footprint under 60M and cpu load of 3.6% on a 3.6GHz processor.. It also has a web-client interface, and is open source.

My pgp key ID:
0x3E4258F8382DE6D0
available at subkeys.pgp.net (and others)
key fingerprint:
2F0C 4109 C8C3 B8BE E0B9 84DF 3E42 58F8 382D E6D0
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11-25-2013, 08:21 PM
Post: #5
RE: Tixati : freeware torrent p2p client
AFAICT, it's not opensource; it's freeware/shareware. So yeah, buyer beware.
(whether the author(s) would share the code for personal inspection upon request? i have no idea)

i've not heard of "transmission" (?).
(just like prior to yesterday, i'd not heard of the nifty Tixati...)

Is it voluntary? (because if it isn't, what inherently is it?)
And can it be voluntary, if there's indoctrination, intimidation, coercion, threats & initiation of violence?
[not to be confused with asking: can it be said to be "voluntary" even when such is present.?]
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
11-25-2013, 08:50 PM
Post: #6
RE: Tixati : freeware torrent p2p client
(11-25-2013 08:21 PM)eye2i2hear Wrote:  AFAICT, it's not opensource; it's freeware/shareware. So yeah, buyer beware.
(whether the author(s) would share the code for personal inspection upon request? i have no idea)

i've not heard of "transmission" (?).
(just like prior to yesterday, i'd not heard of the nifty Tixati...)

Transmission is the default torrent client in most linux distros, but is also windows, OS X, and BSD compatible, as well as being included in many consumer NAS solutions.

My pgp key ID:
0x3E4258F8382DE6D0
available at subkeys.pgp.net (and others)
key fingerprint:
2F0C 4109 C8C3 B8BE E0B9 84DF 3E42 58F8 382D E6D0
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11-26-2013, 09:49 AM
Post: #7
RE: Tixati : freeware torrent p2p client
~thanks

Is it voluntary? (because if it isn't, what inherently is it?)
And can it be voluntary, if there's indoctrination, intimidation, coercion, threats & initiation of violence?
[not to be confused with asking: can it be said to be "voluntary" even when such is present.?]
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
01-16-2018, 01:12 PM (This post was last modified: 01-16-2018 01:14 PM by eye2i2hear.)
Post: #8
RE: Transmission & freeware torrent p2p clients
Investigating
(11-25-2013 08:50 PM)WorBlux Wrote:  Transmission is the default torrent client in most linux distros, but is also windows, OS X, and BSD compatible, as well as being included in many consumer NAS solutions.

News forwarded fyc/fwiw/etc:

Quote:BitTorrent users beware: Flaw lets hackers control your computer

Dan Goodin 1/15/2018

“Low complexity” hack for Transmission client may work against other clients, too.

There's a critical weakness in the widely used Transmission BitTorrent app that allows websites to execute malicious code on some users' computers. That's according to a researcher with Google's Project Zero vulnerability reporting team, who also warns that other BitTorrent clients are likely similarly susceptible.

Researcher Tavis Ormandy published the proof-of-concept attack code last week, along with a detailed description of the underlying vulnerability it exploited.

Normally, Project Zero withholds publication of such details for 90 days or until the developer has released a fix. In this case, however, Ormandy's private report to Transmission included a patch that completely fixed the vulnerability. The researcher went ahead and disclosed the vulnerability last Tuesday—only 40 days after the initial report—because Transmission developers had yet to apply it. Ormandy said the publication would allow Ubuntu and other downstream projects to independently install the fix.

"I'm finding it frustrating that the Transmission developers are not responding on their private security list," Ormandy wrote in Tuesday's public report. "I suggested moving this into the open so that distributions can apply the patch independently."

A Transmission development official told Ars that he expected an official fix to be released "ASAP" but was not specific. He said the vulnerability was present only when users enabled remote access and disabled password protection. He said people who run the unpatched version of Transmission as a daemon should ensure they have enabled password protection.

DNS rebinding strikes again Ormandy's proof-of-concept attack exploits a Transmission function that allows users to control the BitTorrent app with their Web browser. The researcher said most people don't enable password protection because they assume the JSON RPC interface can only be controlled by someone with physical access to the computer running Transmission. Using a hacking technique known as domain name system rebinding, Ormandy devised a way that the Transmission interface can be remotely controlled when a vulnerable user visits a malicious site. He said he confirmed his exploit works on Chrome and Firefox on Windows and Linux and that he expects other platforms and browsers are also affected.

Attackers can exploit the flaw by creating a DNS name they are authorized to communicate with and then making it resolve to the localhost name of the vulnerable computer. In a separate posting publishing the patch, Ormandy wrote:

1. A user visits|http://attacker.com|, which has an|<iframe>|to a
subdomain the attacker controls.
2. The attacker configures their DNS server to respond alternately
with|127.0.0.1|and|123.123.123.123|(an address they control)
with a very low TTL.
3. When the browser resolves to|123.123.123.123|, they serve HTML
that waits for the DNS entry to expire (or force it to expire by
flooding the cache with lookups), then they have permission to
read and set headers.

Among the things an attacker can do is change the Torrent download directory to the user's home directory. The attacker could then command Transmission to download a Torrent called ".bashrc" which would automatically be executed the next time the user opened a bash shell.
Attackers could also remotely reconfigure Transmission to run any command of their choosing after a download has completed. Ormandy said the exploit is of "relatively low complexity, which is why I'm eager to make sure everyone is patched."

In a tweet, Ormandy said the vulnerability was the "first of a few remote code execution flaws in various popular torrent clients." He didn't name the other apps because the 90-day Window hasn't closed yet .

While last week's disclosure has the most immediate consequences for Transmission users, its lessons about the dangers of DNS rebinding are broadly applicable to people using a wide range of apps.

"I regularly encounter users who don't accept that websites can access services on localhost or their intranet," Ormandy wrote. "These users understand that services bound to localhost are only accessible to
software running on the local machine and that their browser is running on the local machine—but somehow believe that accessing a website 'transfers' execution somewhere else. It doesn't work like that, but this is a common source of confusion."

[Image: transmission-poc.png]

[Image: 34841025-b4018ed4-f6bb-11e7-8757-818b1f676106.png]

Dan Goodin. Dan is the Security Editor at Ars Technica, which he joined in 2012 after working for The Register, the Associated Press, Bloomberg News, and other publications.
*click on images to view in original size

Is it voluntary? (because if it isn't, what inherently is it?)
And can it be voluntary, if there's indoctrination, intimidation, coercion, threats & initiation of violence?
[not to be confused with asking: can it be said to be "voluntary" even when such is present.?]
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
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