Gringo lingo: a moment in communication history
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Gringo lingo: a moment in communication history
10-08-2016, 06:59 AM
Post: #16
RE: Gringo lingo: a moment in communication history
lingo fungo...







Is it voluntary? (because if it isn't, what inherently is it?)
And can it be voluntary, if there's indoctrination, intimidation, coercion, threats & initiation of violence?
[not to be confused with asking: can it be said to be "voluntary" even when such is present.?]
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02-06-2017, 02:32 PM (This post was last modified: 02-06-2017 02:36 PM by eye2i2hear.)
Post: #17
RE: Gringo lingo: a moment in communication history
#slappedbyaRuler #dyslexiaisstoopid #anarkyinaction #theirisnowe

Mz Okrent strikes again and Wrote:How Did English End Up With There/Their/They’re?

Admit it. You get it wrong sometimes. I don’t care how many degrees you have, how steeped you are in the highest register of formal discourse, how vicious you are with the red pen, how many children’s wrists you have slapped with a ruler. You sometimes write there when you mean their or they’re.

Yes, you. You may catch it every time, correct it before pressing “send,” but you do it. The language just makes it so easy to do. Not only are these three words pronounced exactly the same, they are all constantly in use in everyday discourse. Wait and weight or flour and flower just aren’t as frequent. Most people aren’t going to mix those up.

So there’s no reason to be especially proud of not mixing them up, or to make smug memes about them. But there/their/they’re is a cleverly laid, dastardly trap. To tout your mastery of this trio is an act of pride in your ability to skip over the trap.

So who set this trap? We did, of course, which is to say all the English [AEngloish] speakers who came before us. First, in the earliest stages of Old English, we had the word for "there," which was then spelled þǽr (thǽr). The word for "their" was hiera, so there was no problem telling them apart. But when Scandinavian settlers starting coming over around the year 1000, we started borrowing a few things from them, including their word for "their": þaire (thaire).

Now we had two words with somewhat similar, but still different pronunciations and spellings. The following centuries brought a huge upheaval in English pronunciation through the Great Vowel Shift and the development of Middle and Modern English, while at the same time the spread of the printing press and literacy brought stable spelling conventions into being. Through all this, there at one point or another got the spellings thar, thaire, ther, yar, theer,thiar, and thore. Their went through its own changes with thayir, thayre, yaire, and theer. Sometimes they overlapped and had the same spellings, sometimes they didn’t, but when the dust settled and the final habits had been established, we were left with one pronunciation and two spellings.

The latest entry into the trio was they’re. People didn’t write contractions of this kind until the late 16th century, though they did say them before then. Writers began to use the apostrophe to stand for missing letters, as it does in 'tis or o’er. It couldn’t be helped that "they are" shortened into a word that sounded just like their and there. The same thing happened to I’ll/aisle and we’ve/weave, but aisle and weave didn’t show up often enough to turn the similarity into a trap.

It didn’t have to be this way. If things had gone differently, we might have ended up with one spelling for all of them, or at least for the first two. This is what happened to rose (the flower) and rose (the past tense of rise), or rock (stone) and rock (to sway) [and rock (to ACDC)]. Those came from totally different words that began to be pronounced the same, and then came to be spelled the same. (Chaucer wrote of “the son that roose as rede as rose.”) Those words don’t cause any confusion, and neither would a word like ther, if that’s what we had somehow ended up with for all members of the trio.

But that’s not what we ended up with, and so we add there/their/they’re to the long list of things that make writing harder than speaking, things to keep track of, double check, and correct, lest you fall into ther traps. Ther everywhere.

[for more moments in freemarket medium of exchange dictiohistory] see also...
Why Does 'Will Not' Become 'Won't'?

Why Is It 'Eleven, Twelve' Instead of 'Oneteen, Twoteen'?

*"The Great Vowel Shift" knot two bea necessarily confused with "The Great Vowel Movement" (see mental NonExlax).?

--upheaval2i

bonus romp:

You might be a miniStatetheist (when it comes to mediums of exchange) if... (see the last paragraph)

Quote:Why Isn't 'Arkansas' Pronounced Like 'Kansas'?

Kansas and Arkansas aren’t so far from each other on the map, but their names seem to want nothing to do with each other. Though they share all but two letters in common, Kansas comes out as “KANzis” and Arkansas as “ARkansaw.” Why so different?

Kansas was named for the Kansa, a Siouan tribe that lived in the region. The Kansa people were called, in plural, Kansas, and that became the name of the state. But before it did, English, French, and Spanish speakers, as well as speakers of various Native American languages, all came up with their own ways of pronouncing (and writing) the name of the tribe. The Kansa themselves pronounced it with a nasalized “a” (rather than a full “n”), a “z,” and an “eh” sound – approximately “kauzeh.” Everyone else had their own versions, and historical records show all kinds of spellings: Kansa, Kansas, Kantha, Kances, Konza, Kauzas, Canees, Canceys… Eventually, Kansas won out.

Arkansas was named for a related Siouan tribe, the Quapaw. The Algonquians called them “akansa,” joining their own a- prefix (used in front of ethnic groups) to the Kansa name (the same root as that for Kansas).

The Algonquians’ name for the Quapaw was picked up by others, and was also spelled in various ways: Akancea, Acansea, Acansa.

However, it was the French version, Arcansas, that became the basis for the eventual state name. In French the final plural s is not pronounced.

Somehow, the English speakers that took over after the Louisiana Purchase decided to go with a modified French spelling along with a French pronunciation – an s on the page, but not on the tongue. (Incidentally, the name Ozark comes from French aux Arcs, short for aux Arcansas. And the same native word that became Wichita in Kansas went with the Frenchified spelling Ouachita in Arkansas.)

Actually, it took some time for Arkansans to come to agreement on pronunciation. In 1881, a heated disagreement between the state's two senators, one who said “arKANzis” and the other who said “ARkansaw,” led to a ruling by the state legislature making the “ARkansaw” pronunciation official. Ever since, Americans have gone along with the s-less, first-syllable-stressed version of Arkansas. At least when it comes to the state name.
The people of Kansas don’t go any further than that. For them it's the “arKANzis” River, and “arKANzis” City.

August 20, 2014

--NonOfficial2i (the artist formally known, 4them, as medium anARKassE2i)

#Rules #Rulers #Smacked #theirisnopeople #thereisnoarKANsas #Kansasrock?CarryOn #languageisaparade(inanydirection?)!?
Is it voluntary?

Is it voluntary? (because if it isn't, what inherently is it?)
And can it be voluntary, if there's indoctrination, intimidation, coercion, threats & initiation of violence?
[not to be confused with asking: can it be said to be "voluntary" even when such is present.?]
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02-06-2017, 06:31 PM
Post: #18
RE: Gringo lingo: a moment in communication history
I've haven't any communication history to offer. Rather, a curiosity; words spelled the same that require context/qualifier to determine pronunciation. Some examples:
Painting
A mother said to her daughter, "I'll read to you what I read yesterday."
One hiker said to the other, " Get the lead out of your ass and lead the way."
One ballerina said to another, "I live to do live performances".

Stir the Pot
Context?, qualifires?, rules for pronunciation?... We don't need no stinkin' rules; one baby said to another:
"Tath nwsioitnttaihngd ew lilw ntlohenesse nhetiri rihet lwdro nda kema ti uro nwo."

Understanding "baby-talk/pronunciation", the one baby above said to the other:
"That notwithstanding we will nonetheless inherit their world and make it our own."

--&e Cool

What’s the difference between the government and the mafia?
The mafia doesn’t have a twelve year indoctrination system to convince you it’s not organized crime. ~ Brett Veinotte
Government public "education"/indoctrination is child abuse.
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02-07-2017, 07:21 AM
Post: #19
RE: Gringo lingo: a moment in communication history
another fore the read curiosity history phile:
Quote:I was looking for a name like the Crickets that meant two things, and from crickets I got to beetles. And I changed [it to] B E A because … B E E T L E S didn't mean two things, so I changed … the E to an A. And it meant two things then. … When you said it, people thought of crawly things; and when you read it, it was beat music.
--John Lennon, on the origin of the band name

Lennon, the anarchissed.¿

[Image: three_blind_mice_lg_nwm.thumbnail.gif] Rules: whatever is agreed to/too/two. ☐ Agree?

--ant Bea2i (the artist formally known as Gomer2iPile)

#shecameinthrewthebathroomwindow♫
#languageisaparade...
#languageisadance?

Is it voluntary? (because if it isn't, what inherently is it?)
And can it be voluntary, if there's indoctrination, intimidation, coercion, threats & initiation of violence?
[not to be confused with asking: can it be said to be "voluntary" even when such is present.?]
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Quote this message in a reply
02-07-2017, 11:58 AM (This post was last modified: 02-07-2017 12:01 PM by eye2i2hear.)
Post: #20
RE: Gringo lingo: a moment in communication history
...
& aye 3-weigh won buy hour very on: [Image: avatar_32178.jpg?dateline=1466007899] Boxer!

Sunglasses Happy
--blindleadingtheblind2i (the artist formerly known fore fighting his way into Pandora's Box --and the whorse she road inn own)

Is it voluntary? (because if it isn't, what inherently is it?)
And can it be voluntary, if there's indoctrination, intimidation, coercion, threats & initiation of violence?
[not to be confused with asking: can it be said to be "voluntary" even when such is present.?]
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
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